Fentanyl Is So Dangerous That Even Drug Dealers Decline To Trade It

Fentanyl Is So Dangerous That Even Drug Dealers Decline To Trade It

Headlines Health

The dark web for long has been a major point for illegal substances with unspecified drug dealers selling everything ranging from methamphetamine to marijuana. But fentanyl is the substance even online drug dealers are concerned to deal with. The Guardian reported that chief dark web drug suppliers have started voluntarily restricting the synthetic opioid, stating that it is too deadly to trade.

According to the NCA (National Crime Agency, UK), dealers are removing the drug and categorizing it in other items that are at high-risk to trade. Vince O’Brien—one of the NCA’s leads on drugs—said that it appeared to have been agitated by fears that dealing a drug that is related to fatalities would more possibly gain police attention. He further said to The Guardian, “If people have got dealers selling very high-risk substances, then it is going to add to the risk for them. There are marketplaces that will not allow listings for explosives and weapons; those are also the ones that would not allow listings for fentanyl. Obviously, the law enforcement would prioritize the delivering of explosives, weapons, and fentanyl over.” Fentanyl is a chemical and synthetic drug that was produced by a Belgian doctor in the 1950s. This drug is usually prescribed to people having chronic pain and cancer, and it is legally sold in Australia.

Recently, the NCA was also in news for stating that a $3.8 Million in a day drug trade business is contributing to increasing the knife crimes in the U.K. An outbreak of knife attacks is devastating police forces across the U.K. and a new report states that drug trafficking business is moderately responsible for the growing crime rate. A study by Sky News was disclosed recently, that showed the drug trade by dealers in the U.K. is operating over 2,000 “county lines.” Reportedly, the organized crime networks and gangs use children to sell drugs from large cities such as London or Manchester to small countryside and towns.