African Researchers Are Closer To Develop A Malaria Vaccine

African Researchers Are Closer To Develop A Malaria Vaccine

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Malaria is still a chief issue in Africa. There are almost 200 Million clinical cases reported every year and about half a million deaths. There are various methods through which malaria can be regulated. Preventive steps comprise indoor spraying programs or use of insecticides in bed nets. Medicines can also be utilized to prohibit or cure malaria, but resistance frequently develops and drugs lose their efficiency.

The WHO (World Health Organization) stated that advancement in controlling malaria has slow down. In research conducted over past 50 Years, scientists’ revealed that blood could be taken from grown-ups who are immune and utilized to cure children admitted with malaria. Antibodies in the blood were accountable for this outcome; in simple words, antibodies could cure malaria. Researchers have been attempting to extract the exact antibodies that perform this function. The main challenge is that the human body produces millions of antibodies, so extracting out those with the anti-malarial activity has been complicated. One technique to recognize these “good” antibodies is to evaluate the blood samples of infected people with malaria to those who are not infected, aiming to identify the differences. This type of studies has been conducting for about 30 Years, but the outcomes have been questionable.

Recently, the WHO was also in news for reporting that Ebola outbreak in the DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo) will be there for at least the next 6 Months. An Ebola outbreak in the DRC has killed nearly 200 people since the month of August. Dr. Peter Salama—emergencies chief—stated that the central African country’s temporary “tradi-modern” health centers, which serves both traditional and modern healing were “important drivers” in transmitting the disease. He further added that the unofficial clinics were considered to be connected to patients in Beni, a city of 800,000 people where diseases have been concentrated. It was “very possible” several cases of Ebola had been misidentified as malaria since the early symptoms are same, he said.